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be educated. striking a chord in afghanistan where women have seen their prospects change dramatically in recent years. more than 3 million girls now get some education, that is a big rise from when they weren't allowed to go to school at all. many fear that trend could reverse itself after withdrawal of foreign troops. >> an old seen in a changing afghanistan. it is the time of the potato harvest. the children are working in the field that they have done -- as they have done for centuries. families depend on their labour. while the 10-year-old helps out with the farming, she also goes to school. making the long walk every day. >> i am in the second class. we did not have school before. i am really happy i am going to school. >> today is a lesson in the local language. in one fifth of afghan women can read or write, but that is a big improvement from a decade ago. the schools in remote areas are helping. there is a big turnout for the launch of this government school. 3 million afghan girls are getting some education. it still leaves 2 million that have never been the class. but attitu
until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to latino kids and african americans and that they were showing up in school way behind their peers as a result because as you mentioned maybe the education system failed them. then doing very poorly, higher drop out rates, all that sort of thing. what do you think about the position that have article? >> i read the article i thought it was garbage, i think there were a lot of assumptions made that just don't match reality. i mean, i attended university and i think affirmative action enabled me to fully integrate in to the full pro
an education. the economic crisis and some are ready to celebrate. and he may be -- they may be numbered two on the ticket, but the vice presidential candidates traded verbal blows last night as election day lems. -- looms. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. today people in pakistan observed a day of prayer for malala yousafzai. she is a 14-year-old girl shot in the head by the taliban. her crime was to campaign for girls like herself to have an education. the attack has been condemned across the globe. our journalist was the first to report from her home town. >> prayers across pakistan have been dedicated to malala. the 14-year-old remains in critical condition, three days after a taliban assassin shot her in the head. just two weeks ago the girl that has become the focus of worldwide attention was filmed at home, helping her younger brother with his work. it is for her own writings she became famous. the school flag flies at half mast. the students do not know when she will return here to her desk. everywhere there is evidence of the accolade
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
away with affirmative action. it's not just the education community watching this case. as sylvia hall reports, so are some of the nation's biggest companies. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the university of texas. >> reporter: that's abigail fisher, who was denied a spot in the school's 2008 freshman class. u.t. says race wasn't a factor, but fisher maintains she was rejected because she's white. that accusation could change the way colleges have picked their students for decades. by state law, three quarters of u.t.'s students are accepted automatically, because they are in the top 10% of their high school classes. the rest go through what the university calls a holistic review, considering factors, like grades, essays, personal experiences and race. even fewer students got in that way in 2008, when fisher didn't make the cut. >> there are going to be certain financial consequences to this young lady because she could not attend the school of her preference. as u.t. says, it is critical within texas to be a u.t.
that america has a third world infrastructure. we need to spend more on education. one of the concerns that i raise in my book is america has become the country with the least equality of opportunity of any of the advanced industrial countries. >> equality of opportunity meaning -- >> that the life chances of a child are more dependent on the education and income of his parents than in any of the other advanced countries for which there is data. and the main reason for this is lack of equality, of opportunity for education. for a good education. >> and when you look at education statistics in the u.s. compared to rest of the industrialized world, we fell to what? >> we're way in the middle. we-- we are not at the top of the league any more by a long shot. we need to spend more on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the stimulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it a commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political
modern governors with major improvements in education, public safety, welfare reform, and job creation. it described how i worked with leaders in the other party to get these good results for the people. the article also described tim's term as governor, bad economy, and his decision, his choice to spend the fourth year as governor serving as national party chairman rather than focusing on the dire economic crisis in virginia. it's really the great unanswered question in this campaign. how does a governor decide to take on a second job that sends him all over the country giving partisan speeches while over 100,000 jobs are lost here in virginia? if tim had given his governorship the full attention, he might have avoided some mistakes like increasing college tuition by over 30% or closing rest areas. if tim had been listening to the people of virginia who are really facing tough times, he might not have proposed raising taxes on working people, working women, seniors and small business owners, as well as people earning as little as 17b$,000 a year, and he might have been against the seq
for girls to get an education has been shot and seriously wounded. she was on her way home from school when gunmen opened fire on her schoolus, shooting her in the head and neck. she survived and the doctors say she is out of danger. >> liberal that defied the taliban. she was shot at close range for standing up against militants and insisting that girls have the right to go to school. this was her and her beloved classroom when they tried to take it from her. she refused to back down. in 2009, militants controlling the valley decreed that girls' schools must close. then just 11, she voiced her opposition written under a pen name. this was her injury for january 3. >> i was very scared of getting ready for school today because they announced that the girls should stopped going. our teacher told us that if we come, we should not wear a school uniform and where normal clothes. only 11 attended class today. >> after the militants were driven out, they campaigned for recognition for girls. letting the current glut -- recognition and threats. she will fight on if she makes a good recovery. >> sh
this half seriously, half tongue in cheek-- i'd like to see arne duncan, secretary of education, be put in charge of middle east policy. because i think what we really need to be moving toward this there is a kind of race formula. >> rose: we continue looking at foreign policy issues in the campaign with david sanger of "new york times" and richard haass in the council on foreign relations. >> he basically laid out a conditional foreign policy. saying "look, the era where we give aid to you all and you act as you see it is over. we will work with you but only so long as if you meet us halfway, whether it's protecting our diplomatic missions, the way you treat women, girls and minorities, your foreign policy against israel and terrorism." i think that's an important statement and i think it's one that people in both parties should be able to support. >> he wants to portray president obama has an outlier in american foreign policy. in fact, one of the foreign policy advisors made the point that president obama in his view had departed from 70 years of bipartisan agreement, an agreement in
a 14-year-old activist known for promoting girls' education. malala yousufzai was hit in the head and neck during the attack in the swat valley region. doctors said the wounds were not life-threatening. yousufzai spoke out on girls' education at a u.n. children's assembly last year. the taliban called her work "an obscenity" in a statement claiming responsibility for the attack. one out of every eight people on earth is going hungry, according to a u.n. report today. that comes to 870 million people, but it's far below the figure of one billion announced in 2009. the u.n. food and agriculture organization blamed flawed methodology and poor data for the earlier number, and it said the number of hungry people has been declining steadily in the past two decades. athens, greece, erupted in angry protests today against the visiting chancellor of germany, angela merkel. germany is the leading contributor to the greek bailout, but at a price that's embittered many greeks. we have a report from james mates of independent television news. . >> reporter: at the airport the welcome was warm.
of access to good, healthy foods. >> reporter: government can advise and educate the public about healthy eating, but ultimately it can't demand people change their eating habits or force supermarkets to locate in poorer neighborhoods. >> maybe you have to do something innovative. maybe you actually have a mobile supermarket, grocery, that comes into a community. so on wednesday night when the bookmobile comes and the community health facility comes on wheels, the grocery comes on wheels as well so people can get access to the food that they need. >> reporter: nat turner says the national discussion about food has to move beyond "food security" -- whether or not the poor have enough food to eat -- to something broader. >> a more important conversation is to talk about food justice where people not only have access to it, but they can afford it, where the food is grown sustainably so it's not full of chemicals and all that kind of stuff. that the money for the food stays in the community, and so moving, bringing it up a notch from food security is bringing it up to food justice, right? >>
we need to help to educate more kids and inspire them to learn music. we hope that music will inspire them. tavis: talk to me why it specifically you think classical music, your specialty and your renown is in the classical field. a lot of these kids are taking a classical music. what you think classical music has to offer young people? >> classical music has a deep meaning. maybe it is harder to understand. comparing classical music to barack or hip-hop. it takes us -- rock or hip-hop. it is -- if it is difficult to understand it means the performances bad. is bad.erformance maybe some art takes more time but when you get it, it stays there. tavis: i wrote this down. i have this written down because i wanted to walk through because the work that you are doing with young kids is so powerful and moving for me. this performance coming out is to benefit your foundation but i want to give the audience a sense of all the different things that you do with young people. because there are some different programs. you have the young scholars program. tell me about the young scholars program. >
not touch on some things. immigration is a good example. but education is another one. but it was guided pretty much by the moderator who did a great job conducting this. i don't find the debate wanting on substantive issues. >> if you're my age and you are watching this thing and you're worried about medicare and social security, which of these individuals do you believe? >> it would depend on who you are predisposed to believe. joe biden is a had a liberal, a new deal liberal. i am not averse to point out that, whereas his own president is willing to contemplate raising the retirement age, joe biden said, no, we will not touch these things. these things are sacred. everyone over the age of nine knows that come if you don't know anything -- if you don't do anything for medicare and social security, it will not be around. he made the case. we are the party of social security. the republicans largely oppose it. yes, that is true, for 50 years. what will you do when you're on president has said that medicare will die unless it is reformed? so if you're inclined toward that new deal liberal
. this week, lou's been thinking about who's watching. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> who's watching? on a trip to london, i ran across an interesting newspaper feature called on a typical day in london. it described how many advertisements you would see. how many of those black taxis would pass you, how much you would likely spend on parking and such. one statistic really got my attention: on an average day, you will be on camera 300 times. we're not talking on camera like the one i'm on right now, we're talking security cameras. then, just the other day, my wife and i were having breakfast out at one of those ubiquitous coffee places, a woman came by with one of the most unusual baby strollers i'd ever seen. i commented to her that it was really quite wonderful and before i could finish she blurted, i know you! you spoke at our conference last friday. it reminded me of a great piece of advice i got years ago when i an old friend said, just remember, you're always under your people are watching you like hawks every day to see if your actions match your words. it really do
' education, but her success made her a target for the taliban. the cold-blooded shooting of such an innocent victim has united most of pakistan and its immediate in a wave of revulsion. this shopkeeper says that it is the proof of brutality. this is not an attack on malala, but all the daughters of this nation. the taliban has justified the attack, saying malala was pro- western. some tribal leaders said this was against their -- against islamic practice. >> there are less than four weeks to go until american voters cast their ballots. the presidential candidates are fighting for votes. nevada has the highest rates. residents want help. the candidates are promising to do more, but can they fix america's housing crisis? last week, i went to las vegas, where life is in short supply -- where luck is in short supply. know where have they partied harder -- nowhere have they partied harder. they didn't just gamble with chips. they risked the future, too. >> i was one of the ones to over-extended and spend beyond their means -- ones who over- extended and spent beyond their means. >> she walked awa
felt that because i had an education i should know what i am doing. and a lot of me to grow whichever direction i wanted to grow, and years after i sort of started the company and we all ys had people interested in buying, and there was once i would say look maybe it is time to sell. i don't know that much about the hotel business. and he said, you know, you have never worked for anybody. because he wanted to buy the company and i should stay with him, so he was very wise and able to sort of direct all of his children never raised his voice or his hand to any of us. so we grow up in a very strong window mother who -- tough love was her way and a father who was always there. >> rose: loving and supportive. >> yes. and exceptionally tolerant. and i remember once his, you know, granddaughter came to him and not married and stayed, you know, grandfather i am going have a baby, and he said, wonderful. so you can imagine how supportive a person like that is in your upbringing. so both of my parents allowed us this freedom to become who we wanted to be and -- >> rose: the best thing a parent
. malala yousufzai has been an outspoken critic of taliban atrocities and a promoter of girls' education. the country's prime minister visited the girl's family today at a military hospital near islamabad. he called the shooting an attack on pakistan's core values. >> we pledge that we will not allow the future of our children to be endangered by the militant mind-set. we pledge that the enemies of pakistan will never be allowed to succeed. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a military official said yousufzai is in satisfactory condition, after having a bullet removed from her neck. she's being kept unconscious and on a ventilator for now. this year's winner of the nobel prize for literature voiced hope today that a fellow chinese laureate will get out of prison. mo yan was honored with the literature award yesterday. at a news conference today, he said he hopes that dissident liu xiaobo regains his freedom very soon. liu won the nobel peace prize in 2010 after being sentenced to 11 years in prison for advocating an end to china's one-party rule. the space shuttle "endeavour" has begun a final,
education coverage for kids. so in the basic level. and of course we are creating jobs. probably we need to pay better those jobs but the fact is there. so migration-- migration reaches 0 rate in 2011, 2010 and probably 2012. now it is clear for me that these comprehensive immigration reform is absolutely required. and probably this is the window of opportunity to do that. why? because there is not such pressure in political field with immigration. we are stopping the mexican migration. and we can, or the american congress should consider that reform. that leave the people from the shadows, president obama say, i do believe on that and it could be very good for both country, not only for mexican workers but also for american society, that demand the services of the mexican people. >> rose: president calderon, thank you for joining us. pleasure to have you here. felipe calderon. >> google has changed the way we search, the way we use e-mail, the way we use maps and mobile technology. now it wants to disrupt the world of venture capital. founded in 2009 google ventures aims to maj 80 to 10
, their children, trying to drive education into the process, and yet at the same time, it might look a little different. 36% of advisors seem to think that millennials may not enjoy the same wealth that their parents did. >> susie: it's a tough situation. bernie clark of schwab soadvirs. >> very much appreciated.ad >> susie: a hopeful message today from german chancellor angela merkel during her first visit to greece since europe's debt crisis began three years ago. she told greece's prime minister she hopes greece will stay in the euro-zone and she can "see the light at the end of the tunnel." but that's not how the greeks see it. tens of thousands of people demonstrated outside the parliament building in athens, protesting tough cutbacks the country is being forced to make in exchange for bailout loans. many demonstrators were wearing nazi uniforms. they target merkel as the architect of the tough austerity measures. many investors are stressed and nervs about the upcoming earnings season, even though those earnings from alcoa were better than expected. yum brands also had positive earnings
and educated in england. you present yourself as a secular muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing
education it will eliminate the tax credit people have to be able to send their children to college. it cuts education by 450 billion dollars. it does virtually nothing except continue to increase the tax cuts for the very wealthy. and you know, we have had enough of this. the idea that the so concerned about these deficits, i pointed out, he voted to put two cars on a credit card and he did. >> we're going to the closing statements in a minute. you are gaeing to have your -- >> not raising taxes is not cutting tax, and by the way, our budget we have -- >> 3% a year instead of 4.5%. >> let me calm down things here just for a minute. and i want to talk to you briefly before we go to closing statements about your own personal character. if are you elected, what you could both give to this country as a man, as a human being, that no one else could. >> honesty, no one else could? there are plenty of fine people who could lead this country. but what you need are people who when they say they're going do something, they go do it. what you need are when people see problems they offer solutions to f
's put the ads aside and talk about health care. let's talk about education. let's talk about training. let's talk about new jobs. let's talk about infrastructure. let's talk about our different vision for massachusetts. that's what the people of massachusetts want to talk about. and that's what i think they ought to hear about. >> i think about 10 or 15 minutes in, romney began to realize this was not the easy exercise he thought it was going to be. >> narrator: then romney faltered. the issue was health care. >> i have a plan. i have a position paper on health care. i'm happy to show it to you, senator, any time you'd like. >> mr. romney, it isn't a question of showing me your paper. it's a question of showing all of the people in here that are watching this program the paper. they ought to have an opportunity to know. what is the cost of your program? >> i don't have a cost of my program. >> you don't have a cost? >> no, i'm sorry, i don't have... >> what would be the impact of that on the budget? >> well, the impact, i do not know the specific number. >> so you don't have a cost. >
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)